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track

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Dance like no one is watching, Love like you'll never be hurt, Sing like no one is listening, Live like it's heaven on earth.
William Purkey
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English

Pronunciation

Etymology

(noun) From Old French trac (French: traque), maybe from a Germanic source Dutch: trek, Middle Low German: treck.

Noun

Singular
track

Plural
{{{1}}}

track ({{{1}}})
  1. A mark left by something that has passed along; as, the track, or wake, of a ship; the track of a meteor; the track of a sled or a wheel.
  2. A mark or impression left by the foot, either of man or beast; trace; vestige; footprint.
  3. The entire lower surface of the foot; said of birds, etc.
  4. A road; a beaten path.
  5. Course; way; as, the track of a comet.
  6. A path or course laid out for a race, for exercise, etc.
  7. The permanent way; the rails.
  8. A tract or area, as of land.
  9. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) The distance between the centerlines of two tires, measured where the tires contact the surface of the road (also track width)
  10. (cricket) The pitch.
  11. Sound stored on a record (or the physical track on one).
  12. Circular (never-ending) data storage unit on a side of magnetic or optical disk, divided into sectors.
  13. (uncountable) (sports) The racing events of track and field; track and field in general.
    I'm going to try out for track next week.

Derived terms

Translations

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See also

Verb

Infinitive
to track

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to track (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To observe the (measured) state of an object over time
  2. (transitive) To monitor the movement of a person or object.
  3. (transitive) To discover the location of a person or object (usually in the form track down).
  4. (transitive) To follow the tracks of.
    My uncle spent all day tracking the deer.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

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