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translate

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
If you believed more in life you would fling yourself less to the moment.
Friedrich Nietzsche
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English

Etymology

Derived from Classical Latin translatum, past participle of transferre, from trans- “across” + ferre “to bear”

Pronunciation

Verb

Infinitive
to translate

Third person singular
translat

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to translate (third-person singular simple present translat, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To change text (of a book, document, Web site, movie, anime, video game etc.) from one language to another.
    Hans diligently translated the novel from German into English.
  2. (transitive) To change from one form or medium to another.
    The reknowned director could translate experience to film with ease.
  3. (physics) To subject a body to translation, i.e., to move a body on a linear path with no rotation.
  4. (archaic)(transitive) To move or carry from one place or position to another; to transfer.
    The monk translated the holy relics to their new shrine.
  5. (Christianity) To remove to heaven without a natural death.
    By faith Enoch was translated, that he should not see death; and was not found, because God had translated him. Heb. xi. 5.
  6. (Christianity) To remove, as a bishop, from one see to another.
    Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, when the king would have translated him from that poor bishopric to a better,...refused. Camden.
  7. (obsolete) To cause to lose senses or recollection; to entrance.
    William was translated by the blow to the head he received, being unable to speak for the next few minutes.

Related terms

Translations

Elsewhere on the web

En-En

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En-Fr

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