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verbal

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English

Etymology

From the Late Latin verbalis ('belonging to a word).

Pronunciation

Adjective

verbal (not comparable)

Positive
verbal

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)

  1. Of, or relating to words.
  2. Concerned with the words, rather than the substance of a text.
  3. Consisting of words only.
  4. Expressly spoken or written, as opposed to implied.
  5. (grammar) Derived from, or having the nature of a verb.
  6. (grammar) Used to form a verb.
  7. Spoken and not written; oral.

Antonyms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun

Singular
verbal

Plural
{{{1}}}

verbal ({{{1}}})
  1. (grammar) A verb form which does not function as a predicate, or a word derived from a verb. In English, infinitives, participles and gerunds are verbals.

Translations

Verb

Infinitive
to verbal

Third person singular
verbals

Simple past
verballed

Past participle
-

Present participle
verballing

to verbal (third-person singular simple present verbals, present participle verballing, simple past and past participle verballed)
  1. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To fabricate a confession
    • 1982, John A. Andrews, Human Rights in Criminal Procedure: A Comparative Study, ISBN 9024725526, BRILL, page 128
      "The problem of 'verballing' is unlikely to disappear, whatever the legal status of the person detained."
    • 2001, Chris Cunneen, Conflict, Politics and Crime: Aboriginal Communities and the Police, ISBN 1864487194, Allen & Unwin, page 116
      "Condren had always claimed that he was assaulted and verballed by police over the murder he had supposedly confessed to committing."
    • 2004, Jeremy Gans & Andrew Palmer, Australian Principles of Evidence, ISBN 1876905123, Routledge Cavendish, page 504
      "Moreover, given the risk of verballing, it is by no means apparent that it is in the interests of justice that the prosecution have the benefit of admissions that are made on occasions when recordings are impracticable."

See also

Elsewhere on the web

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