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wane

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
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English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

The noun is derived from Old English wana (defect, shortage); the verb, from Old English wanian via Middle English wanien. Both ultimately trace to a Germanic root *wano-.

Noun

Singular
wane

Plural
{{{1}}}

wane ({{{1}}})
  1. A gradual diminution in power, value, intensity etc.
    • 1913, Michael Ott, The Catholic Encyclopedia, "Wenzel Anton Kaunitz",
      His influence which was on the wane during the reign of Joseph II grew still less during the reign of Leopold II (1790-2).
  2. The period of the lunar cycle during which the moon's surface diminishes.
    • 1926, H. P. Lovecraft, "The Moon-Bog",
      It was very dark, for although the sky was clear the moon was now well in the wane, and would not rise till the small hours.
  3. (literary) The end of a period.
    Wane siding on a cabin at S.B. Elliott State Park
  4. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) A rounded corner caused by lack of wood, often showing bark.
    • 2002, Peter Ross, Appraisal and Repair of Timber Structures, p. 11,
      Sapwood, or even bark, may appear on the corners, or may have been cut off, resulting in wane, or missing timber.
Synonyms
Usage notes
  • When referring to the moon or a time period, the word is found mostly in prepositional phrases like in or on the wane.

Verb

Infinitive
to wane

Third person singular
wan

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
ing

to wane (third-person singular simple present wan, present participle ing, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (intransitive) To progressively lose its splendor, value, ardor, power, intensity etc.; to decline.
  2. (intransitive) Said of light that dims or diminishes in strength.
  3. (intransitive, astronomy) Said of the Moon as its through the phases of its monthly cycle during which its visible surface is progressively decrease.
    • 1866, Sabine Baring-Gould, Curious Myths of the Middle Ages, "The Man in the Moon":
      The fall of Jack, and the subsequent fall of Jill, simply represent the vanishing of one moon-spot after another, as the moon wanes.
  4. (intransitive) Said of a time period that comes to an end.
    • 1894, Algernon Charles Swinburne, "A Swimmer's Dream":
      Fast as autumn days toward winter: yet it seems//Here that autumn wanes not, here that woods and streams
  5. (intransitive, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To decrease physically in size, amount, numbers or surface.
    • 1815, Walter Scott, Guy Mannering, chapter XIX:
      The snow which had been for some time waning, had given way entirely under the fresh gale of the preceding night.
  6. (transitive, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) To cause to decrease.
Antonyms
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Scots wean.

Alternative forms

Noun

Singular
wane

Plural
{{{1}}}

wane ({{{1}}})
  1. (Scotland, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) A child.

Etymology 3

Middle English wōne, wāne (dwelling," "custom), of unclear origins, cf. wont.

Alternative forms

  • wone (Southern England)

Noun

Singular
wane

Plural
{{{1}}}

wane ({{{1}}})
  1. (mostly Template loop detected: Template:context 1) A house or dwelling.

Anagrams

Elsewhere on the web

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