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weed

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To live is to go on a journey; to die is to come back home.
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English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old English wēod.

Noun

Singular
weed

Plural
{{{1}}}

weed ({{{1}}})
  1. (countable) Any plant growing in cultivated ground to the injury of the crop or desired vegetation, or to the disfigurement of the place; an unsightly, useless, or injurious plant.
    If it isn't in a straight line or marked with a label, it's a weed.
  2. (uncountable, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Marijuana.
  3. (obsolete, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Tobacco.
  4. (obsolete, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) A cigar.
  5. (obsolete, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) A horse unfit to breed from.
  6. (countable, UK, Template loop detected: Template:context 2) A puny person; one who has with little physical strength.
  7. (countable, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) A sudden illness or relapse, often attended with fever, which attacks women in childbed.
  8. (uncountable, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Underbrush; low shrubs.
  9. (countable, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Something unprofitable or troublesome; anything useless.
Derived terms
Translations
See also

Etymology 2

From Old English wēodian.

Verb

Infinitive
to weed

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to weed (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. To remove weeds (unwanted vegetation) from (a cultivated area).
    I weeded my flower bed.
Translations
See also

Etymology 3

From Old English wǣd < Proto-Germanic. Compare Dutch lijnwaad, gewaad.

Noun

Singular
weed

Plural
{{{1}}}

weed ({{{1}}})
  1. (archaic) A garment or piece of clothing.
  2. (archaic) Clothing collectively; clothes, dress.
    • 1819, These two dignified persons were followed by their respective attendants, and at a more humble distance by their guide, whose figure had nothing more remarkable than it derived from the usual weeds of a pilgrim. — Walter Scott, Ivanhoe

Etymology 4

From the verb wee.

Verb

weed

  1. Simple past tense and past participle of wee.

References

weed” in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

  • weed” in An American Dictionary of the English Language, by Noah Webster, 1828.

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