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wild

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Life at the top is financially rewarding, spiritually draining, physically exhausting, and short.
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See also Wild

English

Etymology

Old English wilde

Pronunciation

Adjective

wild (comparative er, superlative est)

Positive
wild

Comparative
er

Superlative
est

  1. Untamed; not domesticated.
    The island of Chincoteague is famous for its wild horses.
  2. Unrestrained or uninhibited.
    I was filled with wild rage when I discovered the infidelity, and punched a hole in the wall.
  3. Raucous, unruly, or licentious.
    The fraternity was infamous for its wild parties, which frequently resulted in police involvement.
  4. Visibly and overtly anxious; frantic.
    Her mother was wild with fear when she didn't return home after the party.
  5. Disheveled, tangled, or untidy.
    After a week on the trail without a mirror, my hair was wild and dirty.
  6. Enthusiastic.
    I'm not wild about the idea of a two day car trip with my nephews, but it's my only option.
  7. Inaccurate.
    The novice archer fired a wild shot and hit her opponent's target.

Derived terms

Translations

Adverb

wild (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
wild

Comparative
{{{1}}}

Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. Inaccurately; not on target.
    The javelin flew wild and struck a spectator, to the horror of all observing.

Noun

Singular
wild

Plural
{{{1}}}

wild ({{{1}}})
  1. The undomesticated state of a wild animal
    After mending the lion's leg, we returned him to the wild
  2. (especially Template loop detected: Template:context 1) a wilderness

Verb

Infinitive
to wild

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to wild (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. To commit random acts of assault, robbery, and rape in an urban setting, especially as a gang.
    • 1989, David E. Pitt, Jogger's Attackers Terrorized at Least 9 in 2 Hours, New York Times (April 22, 1989), page 1:
      ...Chief of Detectives Robert Colangelo, who said the attacks appeared unrelated to money, race, drugs, or alcohol, said that some of the 20 youths brought in for questioning has told investigators that the crime spree was the product of a pastime called "wilding".
      "It's not a term that we in the police had heard before," the chief said, noting that the police were unaware of any similar incident in the park recently. "They just said, 'We were going wilding.' In my mind at this point, it implies that they were going to raise hell."...

Dutch

Noun

wild

  1. game (food)

German

Etymology

Old High Germanic wildi

Pronunciation

Adjective

wild (comparative wilder, superlative am wildesten)

  1. wild

Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic ولد (wálada, to give birth).

Noun

wild

  1. birth

Elsewhere on the web

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