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will

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
To live lightheartedly but not recklessly; to be gay without being boisterous; to be courageous without being bold; to show trust and cheerful resignation without fatalism—this is the art of living.
Jean De La Fontaine
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English

Etymology 1

From Old English willa.

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
will

Plural
{{{1}}}

will ({{{1}}})
  1. A person’s intent, volition, decision.
  2. A legal document that states who is to receive a person’s estate and assets after their death.
Usage notes
  • Can be said to be strong, free, independent, etc.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old English *willan

Verb

Infinitive
-

Third person singular
will

Simple past
would

Past participle
-

Present participle
willing

- (third-person singular simple present will, present participle willing, simple past would, past participle -)
  1. Indicating intent to perform the action in the future, or expectation of an event in the future.
    I will go to the store.
    It will rain this afternoon.
  2. Being ready to perform an action or comply with a request, see willing (verbal adjective).
    He is willing to come tomorrow.
  3. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Indicating intent to perform the action in the future.
    • (A date for this quote is being sought): William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night Or What You Will, act IV:
      Good fool, as ever thou wilt deserve well at my hand, help me to a candle, and pen, ink and paper : as I am a gentleman, I will live to be thankful to thee for’t.
    • (A date for this quote is being sought): Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo, chapter LXXIII:
      “I will rejoin you, and we will fly ; but from this moment until then, let us not tempt Providence, Morrel; let us not see each other; it is a miracle, it is a providence that we have not been discovered; if we were surprised, if it were known that we met thus, we should have no further resource.”
  4. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Indicating expectation that the subject will perform the action in the future.
Usage notes
  • Historically, will was used in the simple future sense only in the second and third person, while shall was used in the first person. Today, that distinction is almost entirely lost, and the verb takes the same form in all persons and both numbers. Similarly, in the intent sense, will was historically used with the second and third person, while shall was reserved for the first person.
  • Historically, the present tense is will and the past tense is would.
  • See the usage note at shall.
  • Early Modern English had a past participle would which is now obsolete.
Translations

Etymology 3

Old English willian

Verb

Infinitive
to will

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to will (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To try to make (something) happen by using one's will (intention).
    All the fans were willing their team to win the game.
  2. (transitive) To bequeath (something) to someone in one's will (legal document).
    He willed his stamp collection to the local museum.
  3. (transitive) To intend, decide to do something, wish strongly
    "Sophia can win the race if she wills it."
Synonyms
Translations

See also


German

Verb

will

  1. First person singular of wollen, want
  2. Third person singular of wollen, want

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