Visit the forum if you have a language query!

wind

Definition from Dictionary, a free dictionary
Be aware that young people have to be able to make their own mistakes and that times change.
Gina Shapira
Jump to: navigation, search
Wikipedia-logo-en.png
Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia
See also Wind

English

Etymology 1

From Old English wind (wind). Cognate with Dutch wind, German Wind, Swedish vind, Latin ventus, Welsh gwynt; ultimately probably cognate with weather.

Pronunciation

Noun

Wikipedia-logo-en.png
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
Wikipedia-logo-en.png
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Singular
wind

Plural
s

wind (s)
  1. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Movement of atmospheric air usually caused by convection or differences in air pressure.
    The wind blew through her hair as she stood on the deck of the ship.
    The winds in Chicago are fierce.
  2. (countable) The force developed by the movement of air, expressed as pressure.
    As they accelerated onto the motorway, the wind tore the plywood off the car's roof-rack.
  3. (uncountable) The ability to exert oneself without feeling short of breath.
    After the second lap he has already out of wind.
  4. (India and Template loop detected: Template:context 1) One of the five basic elements (see Wikipedia article on the Classical elements).
    Give me a minute before we jog the next mile — I need a second wind.
  5. (Template loop detected: Template:context 1) Flatus.
    Ewww. Someone passed wind.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
See also

Verb

Infinitive
to wind

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to wind (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)
  1. (transitive) To blow air through a wind instrument or horn to make a sound.
  2. (transitive) To cause (someone) to become breathless, often by a blow to the abdomen.
    The boxer was winded during round two.
  3. (reflexive) To exhaust oneself to the point of being short of breath.
    I can’t run another step — I’m winded.
Translations

Etymology 2

Old English windan

Pronunciation

Verb

Infinitive
to wind

Third person singular
winds

Simple past
wound

Past participle
-

Present participle
winding

to wind (third-person singular simple present winds, present participle winding, simple past and past participle wound)
  1. (transitive) To turn coils of (a cord or something similar) around something.
    Please wind up that kite string.
  2. (transitive) To tighten the spring of the clockwork mechanism such as that of a clock.
    Please wind up that old-fashioned alarm clock.
  3. (ergative) To travel, or to cause something to travel, in a way that is not straight
    • The river winds through the plain.
    • 1969: Paul McCartney
      The long and winding road / That leads to your door / Will never disappear.
Derived terms
Translations
Note that “wind” is part of a collaboration project this week, so definitions are likely to change. The tables below may not match definitions above. Translators, please check any additions in a week’s time, or consider other contributions, such as making a separate entry for the foreign word.
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

wind m. (plural winden, diminutive windje)

  1. wind (movement of air)
    De wind waait door de bomen. — The wind blows through the trees.
  2. flatulence, fart (not informal)

Synonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Homophones


Old English

Etymology

From Germanic *winda-, *wenda-, from a suffixed form *we-nt- of Proto-Indo-European *we- (blow, gust). Germanic cognates include Old Frisian wind, Old Saxon wind (Dutch wind), Old High German wint (German Wind), Old Norse vindr (Swedish vind), Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐌽𐌳𐍃. The IE root is also the source of Latin ventus (French vent), Welsh gwynt, Tocharian A want, Tocharian B yente.

Pronunciation

Noun

wind m.

  1. wind
  2. flatulence

Elsewhere on the web

En-En

En-It

En-Fr

En-El

En-Sp

En-Mul

En-De

OnelookIATEIATEIATEIATEProZDict.cc
WordnikIATELinguee
GoogleIATE