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wit

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English

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Pronunciation

Homophones

Etymology 1

From Old English witt, from Proto-Germanic *witjannn from Proto-Indo-European *weid-, wid- (see, know). Cognate with Danish vid, Dutch weet, Gothic 𐌿𐌽𐍅𐌹𐍄𐌹, ignorance, Old High German (wizzi or wizza) (German Witz), Latin videō (see), Old Norse (vit) and Swedish vett. Compare wise.

Noun

Singular
wit

Plural
{{{1}}}

wit ({{{1}}})
  1. (Should we delete(+) this redundant sense?) (now usually in plural) One's mind or sense; sanity.
    Have you completely lost your wits?
  2. (Should we delete(+) this redundant sense?) (archaic) Intellectual ability; faculty of thinking, reasoning.
    Where she has gone to is beyond the wit of man to say.
  3. The ability to think quickly; mental cleverness, especially wittiness.
    My father had a quick wit and a steady hand.
  4. (Should we delete(+) this redundant sense?) (obsolete except in set phrases) Intelligence; common sense.
    The opportunity was right in front of you, and you didn't even have the wit to take it!
  5. (Should we delete(+) this redundant sense?) Spoken humour, especially when clever or quick.
    The best man's speech was hilarious, full of wit and charm.
  6. (rare, Template loop detected: Template:context 1) A person who tells funny anecdotes or jokes; someone witty.
    Your friend is quite a wit, isn't he?
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
Intelligence

Etymology 2

From Old English witan, from Proto-Germanic *witanan, from Proto-Indo-European *weid-, wid- (see, know). Cognate with Dutch weten, German wissen, Swedish veta, and Latin videō (see). Compare guide.

Verb

wit

  1. (ambitransitive, chiefly Template loop detected: Template:context 2) (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought): To know, be aware of (construed with of when used intransitively).
    I wot not what to.
    You are meddling in matters that men should not wit of.
    God wot
Conjugation
Infinitive to wit
Imperative wit!
Present participle witting
Past participle wist
Present indicative Past indicative
First-person singular I wot I wist
Second-person singular thou wot(test) (archaic), you wit thou wist(est) (archaic), you wist
Third-person singular he wot, she wot, it wot he wist, she wist, it wist
First-person plural we wit we wist
Second-person plural ye wit (archaic), you wit ye wist (archaic), you wist
Third-person plural they wit they wist
Usage notes
  • As a preterite-present verb, the third-person singular indicative form is not wits but wot  ; the plural indicative forms conform to the infinitive: we wit, ye wit, they wit.
Derived terms

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch wit.

Adjective

wit

  1. white

Dutch

Pronunciation

Adjective

wit

  1. white
    De wand is wit.
    The wall is white.

Noun

wit n. (plural ten, diminutive je)

  1. (uncountable) white (color)
    Wit is alle kleuren ineens.
    White is all colors at once.
  2. (countable) A person with blond hair.
    De Witte van Zichem.
    The blond boy from Zichem (a famous book).

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *wid-, from Proto-Indo-European *wed-, a suffixed form of *wei- (see ). Cognate with Old Norse vit, Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐍄 (wit), and Lithuanian vèdu.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

wit (personal)

  1. We two; nominative dual form of .

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *widaz, whence also Old English wīd and Old Norse víðr.

Adjective

wit

  1. wide

Elsewhere on the web

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